Patterns of Addiction How Addiction Leads to Loss of Control

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Loss of Control

How Addiction Leads to Loss of Control ?

Written by Ahmed Mujtaba Owaisi

Addiction is very dangerous disease which does not look that you are a child, young, old, educated, doctor, engineer, or even an athlete or a body builder. If you have started the drugs then you will surely get addicted with time. Here we will discuss that how the drug leads the person towards the loss of control and how it makes the substance user as abuser and even addict. There are two patterns in which addiction is developed.

  1. Maintenance Pattern

Loss of Control

        When a person starts using any drug, it travels through the same pattern which are predictable because they have been proved through countless studies. When an individual start using a drug then after a short time comes the maintenance pattern. In maintenance pattern or at maintenance level the person uses the drug to control the withdrawal symptoms of the drug and somehow, he also gets the effects of drugs. Every drug is having different types of withdrawal symptoms and at maintenance level the person even gets positive effects from the drug. For example, a person wants to stay alert at job or wants to stay awake at night to study for the upcoming exam and he uses any stimulant drug. Then he will get some positive effects at this level which will help him to stay awake and alert. At this level, he even thinks that the drug is very useful and he use it as a medication to get its effects and to avoid the withdrawal symptoms. Furthermore, the person is not yet considered as an addict at this level and his life is not affected with his drug use until the second level reaches.

  1. Loss of Control

Loss of Control

                Here comes the second and the most dangerous stage in which the person losses his control over the drug and the drug takes the staring of the life of the person by controlling his life. Loss of control occurs at three levels.

  • Loss of Control over The Amount of Drug
  • Loss of Control over Time and Place
  • Loss of Control over the Duration of Episode of Drug Use

Loss of Control over The Amount of Drug:

        At the first level, the person loss his control over the amount of the drug used. This occurs because of the tolerance level. At tolerance level, the addict needs to increase the amount of drug to get the same effects of the drug which he got at initial level with a small amount of the drug. In this way, the person slowly losses his control over the amount of drug and increases the amount of drug with time.

Loss of Control over Time and Place

How Addiction Leads to Loss of Control

Loss of control over time and place is very easy to be noted by the other members of the family. At this stage, the person who initially uses the drug hidden from family, friends, and relatives starts using the drug over wrong time and place to manage his withdrawal symptoms. For example, a person who works at an office started using a drug but did not use it ever at his office but at this level he starts using the drug at his office too. Driving while intoxicated is also an example of reaching at this level.

Loss of Control over the Duration of Episode of Drug Use

How Addiction Leads to Loss of Control

Finally comes the last stage which is the loss of control over the duration of the episode of drug use. Initially the person uses the drug at specific duration and have a lot of gap between two episodes of drug use. While at this level the person uses more drug and more frequently than he used to do in past. For example, a person who starts smoking initially smoke a few cigarettes during the whole day but at loss of control over amount of drug use the number of cigarettes smoked daily is increased significantly. But still the person has a gap of time duration between two cigarettes. While at this level of loss of control over duration of episode the person losses his control over the duration and smoke multiple cigarettes in a short time.

Reference

Rogers, R., & McMillin, C. (1992). Freeing someone you love from alcohol and other drugs: a step-by-step plan starting today!. Perigee.